mango season
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dhrupad:

LISTEN: all life’s pleasures, which are also griefs
This is an ongoing collection of interestingly sequenced, written, and performed songs from mostly social/historical films I’ve watched. Auteurs include Mrinal Sen, Ritwik Ghatak, Kamal Swaroop, Bimal Roy, and Tapan Sinha among others and the forms of those songs have various influences like Rabindra sangeet, folk music, ghazals, Hindustani classical, Sufi, and the devotional bhajan. I just have found it worth noting how they have been used in even films that have been touted as “realistic” and on par with the more instrumental and classically inclined choices of cinema from western canon.
o nodi re (neel akasher neechey, 1958)
majhi yeh toh majdhar hai (nagarik, 1952)
hawa hai (hun hunshi hunshilal, 1992)
kitna badal gaya insaan (nastik, 1954)
papiha re (kismet, 1942)
duniya kisi ke pyar mein (jaag utha insan, 1966)
it’s like a sea baby (om dar-b-dar, 1988)
majhi tor naam jani na (meghe dhaka tare, 1960)
nazar lagi raja (the other song, 2009)
piya ke aavan ki (kshudhita pashan, 1960)
ab na zubaan pe taala dalo (dharti ke lal, 1946)
koto dur aar koto dur (marutirtha hinglaj, 1959)
lagta nahi hai dil (lal qila, 1960)
charu upset (charulata, 1964)
na jaan re (biraj bahu, 1954)
sar jo tera chakraye (pyaasa, 1957)
anandamoi’s husband’s song (apanjan, 1968)
tu pyar ka sagar hai (seema, 1955)
ghata ghanaghor ghor (tansen, 1943)
aaj kaun gali gayo sham (pakeezah, 1976)
yeh kaun aaj aaya (nartaki, 1940)
bablu babylon se (om dar-b-dar, 1988)
katha suno re logon (bombay our city, 1985)
o majhi mere sajan (bandini, 1963)
aaj jyotsna raate (komal gandhar, 1961)
o rasiya (daasi, 1944)
akash bhora surjo tara (meghe dhaka tare, 1960)
lo har cheez lelo (ab dilli door nahin, 1957)
garba song (mirch masala, 1987)
maula salim chishti (garm hava, 1974)

"Whenever I’m confused about something, I ask God to reveal the answers to my questions, and he does.”
blackfashion:

Marcus & Chloe 
Dallas
Photographed & Submitted by : Jalonni
are u tired of listening to me talk shit about riot grrrl yet?

thecoalitionmag:

image

discussing the obvious lack of interest that today’s riot grrrls have as to why black women weren’t/aren’t present in this movement, among other things.  

by fabiola c

A lot of people think that this phenomenon of black women being demonized for doing certain things while white women get praised for the exact same thing is a new phenomenon but it truly isn’t. This shit has been going on forever, and riot grrrl is a great example as to how deep it goes and how many different ways it can be manifested. At my first introduction to riot grrrl, I was very amazed at the fact that nobody shamed these women for being angry. And today I still think about it, how the angry white woman gets by without being casted as a monster. Of course, I know why. Anybody with the ability to see through glass knows why.

I used to think that when it came to Riot Grrrl, the only thing needed to be done was throw some black girls in the mix and everything will be balanced. this is a very screwed and fucked up way to view the issue because black women of the 90s rioted like hell, with Lil Kim rapping about oral sex like it was nobody’s business and TLC changing up the game when it came to women publicly lamenting about beauty standards while simultaneously looking down on men who weren’t shit. But the issue here is that these women were (and still are) dragged through the dirt, despite how revolutionary they were. And so are all other black female artist who aren’t seen as feminist icons but as vulgar and vapid sluts. No one is making documentaries on how many lives these women have impacted. Is this because these women aren’t showing their feminism through a punk rock lense, like Bikini Kill? Or is it because we just aren’t considered people in this movement?

Read More

(via immigrantgirls)

1 week ago | Permalink
boyishdivision:

a kid went to the Museum of Modern Art and this was their amazing experience they wrote on a visiters card

(Source: whackedup, via treeetunnels)

Warning’ by Langston Hughes

godgussie:

"Negroes,

Sweet and docile,

Meek, humble, and kind:

Beware the day

They change their mind.”

(Source: godgazi, via eyebrowgamestupid)

1 week ago | Permalink

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